I’m confused as hell why I like the Edison Beaumont so much

Here’s the backstory.

I’ve wanted an Edison Collier for a long time, but never quite got around to pulling the trigger before the gold nib frenzy stole me away. A guy on Facebook (hi Nick!) posted an Edison Beaumont for sale for £75 (about half retail) a month or so back. I jumped on it, because I’d had a couple of beers and have no self-restraint at the best of times.

Then I did a quick Google and realised that the Beaumont is a tiny bloody pen even by normal people standards.

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One of these sections is not like the others.

Go on, check it out on Goulet — they’ve got the best photos. It’s late here and I’m on my third blog post of the day.

See? Short, narrow section, the works. The nib is practically as wide as the section. I like big pens, remember.

Oh well, I thought. I’ll try it out and then flip it for what I paid for it.

Then it turned up and I rather fell in love.

Three facts were responsible.

For one, posting the cap (very deeply, incidentally) transforms the writing experience. Aside from a Kaweco Sport, I’ve never felt that posting a pen improves the feel. This one does.

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Behold! A normal pen!

For two, the nib is just amazing. It’s a generic steel #6, but it’s tuned to perfection. So smooth, wet, a delicious medium that’s practical and fun. Honestly this is in my top five nibs and it’s not even gold. I’m not sure what that does to my worldview.

For three, wow, everything that people say about the Edison fit and finish is spot on. The threads are great, polish is perfect, and while the Black Onyx flaked acrylic may not have been my preferred colour, it’s beautiful (I’m resisting using the word “chattoyance”) and harmonises perfectly with the design, down to the black section and finials with the simple silver cap band and clip.

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The acrylic has won me over.

Now I get it. The Edison personality is coming through loud and clear. Classic design, fantastic build quality, great writing experience.

Of course, now I really want a Collier.

I wonder if the Writing Desk will put me out of my misery and send me one for review?

11 thoughts on “I’m confused as hell why I like the Edison Beaumont so much

  1. I have a Collier with an Edison stub nib (very crisp for a stub). Completely agree with you on fit and finish – and the green/gold acrylic on mine is very attractive. I must admit I’m not a huge fan of the section design – it’s chunkier than the Beaumont, but that sharply convex shape is very prescriptive and I always end up feeling I have to hold the pen too close to the nib.

    (Oh and the Collier definitely wins the award for most amount of redundant space in a cap – there’s a good inch beyond the tip of the nib).

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  2. I have the Edison Menlo pump filler. I get the 1.5mm stub, and am happy with it. The Menlo does post. Of course to flush it, you have to pump it. I’ve been wanting an Edison Beaumont pneumatic, but I think I could be happy with a C/C model to save some money.

    I received an Italix Parson’s Essential and it wrote horribly. Skipped with the three inks I tried. Advice on the Fountain Pen Network was to get an Edison nib for it.

    I contacted Brian Gray, and he wrote the Edison preferred to see Edison nibs on Edison pens. He referred me to the Edison site meisternibs.com for a non-branded nib that was a couple dollars less. I chose the 1.1mm italic, and wow! The Italix wrote, and even works in the passport size Travelers Notebook calendar month format.

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  3. I bought a 1.1mm stub Collier in burnished gold some while back. I was going to upgrade to an 18K nib, but then I wrote with one belonging to someone else… switched back and forth a couple times, and {almost reluctantly) came to the conclusion that my steel nib was so good, I really didn’t need the gold one. I might upgrade one day, but honestly, I couldn’t defend that choice with any kind of logical argument.

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